Betangible, Leather Goods Manufacturer based in Ubrique (Spain), wish you Merry Christmas

Share

Newsletter
| No Comments »
Posted on December 15th, 2017
  • Share

Many fashion designers look at older times and leather goods collections from the past in order to create their own styles and collections. This pretty recurrent source of inspiration focuses not only on the functional part that old items hold but also on the intrinsic beauty of lifetime craftsmanship. Best selling traditional leather goods, like those you can see below, are being reinterpreted and adapted to present times.

Mad hectic Neon leather accessories may be a good example for this. Old functionality and the current trends are united.

We will soon post some new examples of this.

 

Share

Betangible | Designers | Innovation | Know-How | Newsletter | Products
| No Comments »
Posted on October 14th, 2011
  • Share

The Andalusian leather goods manufacturing industry and Betangible are present in the latest issue of Australian online magazine This Magnificent Life that deals with luxury brands and lifestyle. The article is about the origins of the leather goods industry in Andalusia (Spain), the skills and savoir-faire of Andalusian leather goods craftsmen and the role that Betangible plays in the industry.

You can read the article by clicking here

 

Share

Luxury Goods | Newsletter
| No Comments »
Posted on July 1st, 2011
  • Share

In the second chapter of this series of videos, we presented how leather goods manufacturers in Andalusia (Spain) cut the leather by hand. In a previous article, we also mentioned the three main ways of cutting the leather. Today, we want to show you another video in which you will be able to see how Spanish leather workers cut the leather using a die cutting machine and different cutting metal patterns. Due to the investment that a leather good manufacturer has to do in cutting metal patterns, die cutting is more efficient when a product is produced on a regular basis. For smaller productions, hand cutting is more appropriate.

Share

This is the first post of a series in which we will try to show you the different materials and processes evolved in the manufacturing of a leather item.

Leather is “animal skin dressed for use,” according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary . Animal hides are by-products of the food industry, and therefore we can find many different types of leathers and hides. Although today most leather is made of cattle skin, there are many other types such as lambskin, pigskin and deerskin, which are used in the manufacturing of leather goods. More exotic skins from crocodiles, ostriches or stingrays are also used for more exclusive and costly products.

Chrome-tanned-leather

Today, although more processes can be applied, most hides and skins are transformed into leather by two tanning processes:
  • · Chrome tanned leather is tanned using chrome sulphate. This chemical gives the leather a more supple finish. Colourfastness is better than vegetable tanned leather.
  • · Vegetable tanned leather is tanned using vegetable origin tannins. Vegetable tanned leather is less supple and harder. “Moulded Leather Goods”  must be manufactured with this type of leather.

Cracked-Leather

As for the forms in which leather is usually bought, we can mainly find:

  • · Split leather is obtained when the top-grain is separated from the hide and then, a non-natural layer is applied. Split leather is usually a cheaper type of leather. Split leather is also used to make suede.

  • · Corrected leather has got an artificial layer on it in order to correct the imperfections of the hides that do not meet the minimum quality requirements to make top or full-grain leather.

  • · Top-grain leather has less breathability than full-grain leather due to its “plastic-like” finish coat, which gives this type of leather a greater resistance to stains.

  • · Full-grain leather is the upper section of a hide that has not had any treatments to remove imperfections on its surface. Its breathability and natural touch are very appreciated.

Share

Innovation | Know-How | Manufacturers | Newsletter
| No Comments »
Posted on February 17th, 2011
  • Share

1 · Geographical Location: Ubrique is located between two Natural Parks, Alcornocales (Cork tree) and Grazalema Natural Parks, which have been widely exploited by the inhabitants of this area. For instance:

  • · There is an ancient farming tradition due to the favourable climate and the fertile soil. Cows, bulls, goats and sheep have traditionally been bred and, therefore, products like cheese, milk, meat and leather have always been associated to this area.
  • · High quality vegetable tannins from the cork were used for the leather tanning process.

Betangibe-Alcornocales-Natural-Park

2 · During the Arab occupation of Andalusia (Al-Andalus) there was an exchange of several manufacturing techniques, which gave the craftsmen of this area a worldwide-recognised reputation. In fact, the Spanish term “marroquinería” and the French word “maroquinerie”, which come from the word “Morocco”, are used to refer to the “leather goods industry”

betangible-embossed-leather-Cordoba-Mosque_Western-facadebetangible-embossed-leather-birds

3 · An important Roman Road, which can be visited nowadays, crossed Ubrique mountain range. This fact favoured the development of craft businesses related to the typical products of this area such as leather goods and cheese.

Betangible-Roman-Road-Ubrique-Benaocaz-Cadizbetangible-Nazari-Neighbourhood

4 · People in this area have a vast reputation of being intrepid entrepreneurs. This innate skill has made them be in the vanguard of several innovations in the leather manufacturing process.

5 · The Leather Industry in Andalusia has been able to adapt itself to modern times without loosing the positive values and positive aspects of past times.

Betangible-GR7-footpath-montain-cadiz

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Share

Historical Background | Innovation | Know-How | Newsletter
| No Comments »
Posted on February 15th, 2011
  • Share